Last edited by Tekasa
Thursday, July 30, 2020 | History

2 edition of No war for oil found in the catalog.

No war for oil

Ivan Eland

No war for oil

U.S. dependency and the Middle East

by Ivan Eland

  • 322 Want to read
  • 4 Currently reading

Published by The Independent Institute in Oakland, CA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • National security,
  • Petroleum products,
  • Military History,
  • Petroleum industry and trade,
  • Strategic aspects,
  • Middle East,
  • Prices,
  • Energy policy

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementIvan Eland
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHD9502.U5 E48 2012
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25186074M
    ISBN 101598130463
    ISBN 109781598130461
    LC Control Number2011023157

    Also cited were the UK’s involvement in Nigeria’s civil war, in contrast to the non-intervention in civil wars in other former colonies with no oil reserves (Sierra Leone and Rhodesia, later Zimbabwe); and the former Soviet Union’s involvement in Indonesia (), Nigeria () and Iraq (). The “end of oil” threatens the very future of Western civilization. Oil, Globalization, and the War for the Arctic Refuge examines the politics of drilling for oil in Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, and presents this controversy as a precursor of future “resource wars” .

      A cursory look at a simple oil price chart dating back to the s reveals a series of bumps. Each of these can be pinpointed to wars and conflicts, whether it was the Iranian revolution, the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait or the US-led invasion of Ira. At that time, Germany had no sources of oil even though in , a German discovered oil in what is now northern Iraq, but there was no easy access to it. Realizing that transporting oil by sea could be easily interdicted by the British Navy, the German Government .

    “Donald Rumsfeld famously declared that the Iraq War 'has nothing to do with oil, literally nothing to do with oil.' Nonsense, demonstrates Michael Klare, in Blood and Oil, a compelling new assessment of America's bet on Middle Eastern oil as the lifeblood of the U.S. economy. Klare's mastery of the interplay of natural resources and conflict is unrivaled, and his new study is timely and vitally important.”. In his scholarly but impassioned book, Matthieu Auzanneau provides a wide-ranging account of the effect oil has had on the minutiae of daily life and the grandest geopolitical narratives. The plus column is impressive, at least on first inspection: heat, light, whizzing around in cars, and a seemingly endless stream of derivatives that make the.


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No war for oil by Ivan Eland Download PDF EPUB FB2

“Here at long last is a book that explodes all of the myths underlying the use of military force to protect the global flow of oil. [No War for Oil] not only provides an invaluable account of the misguided policies that have led to ever-increasing U.S. military involvement in the Middle East, but also shows how the demilitarization of U.S.

energy policy would better serve the nation's long-term /5(2). No War for Oil critically reviews the history of various flawed efforts by the U.S. to develop unholy partnerships with different foreign governments to acquire and secure access to oil, from World War I to the present Rather than using oil as a strategic commodity and causing international conflict, Eland's solution is for the U.S.

to use the free-market economy to its advantage. “ War for Oil is a richly resourced, intelligently written, and clearly translated work that concisely describes the colossal blunder that was Germany’s oil strategy. The Nazi leadership’s utter failure to formulate a realistic plan to fuel its military was a chief factor in the Third Reich’s defeat/5(5).

As you read through this book you begin to appreciate how oil supply impacted nearly every operation, tactical planning, and strategic decision making throughout the course of the war.

Highly readable, fascinating, well-cited, and a scary harbinger of how vulnerable modern society is to oil by: 4. In October ofAhmed Rashid -- who later became known for his book Taliban: Militant Islam, Oil and Fundamentalism in Central Asia -- authored a paper on the Unocal project for the Petroleum Finance Company, a private energy consulting firm.

When did oil become such a powerful commodity—during, and in the immediate aftermath of, the First World War. In his groundbreaking book The First World Oil War, Timothy C.

Winegard argues that beginning with the First World War, oil became the preeminent commodity to safeguard national security and promote domestic prosperity. For the first Reviews: 1. The staggering total of corruption, murder, conspiracy, war, and exploitation is enough to explain a large percentage of the world's deaths in the last years.

The book does not go into detail on the other side of oil's evil, pollution and environmental s: a slogan used by antiwar protestors to denounce wars fought in lands where oil is abundant and other countries have business interests at.

For the last hundred years, oil has been a frequent reason for war. Nations have fought wars, or shaped their military strategy during a war, to conquer oil fields or prevent rivals from. All that said, this book is a beautiful love story and is also quite funny.

It might be weird to admit this but if I recall correctly the book nearly made me cry — seriously. This book may be “about” war, but it is, like most of these books, mostly about people.

Knight’s Cross: A Life of Field Marshall Erwin Rommel by David Fraser. The book’s total page may be around The topics covered in this book represent a review of modern approaches and practical methods for analyzing various problems related to geoinformatics of petrophysical rock core analysis.

The petrophysical rock core contains gas or oil which are used as fuel as for energy source. OCLC Number: Notes: "First impression." Description: xii, pages ; 19 cm: Contents: Birth of a world power --A drop of oil is worth a drop of blood --The secret war --Armageddon and oil --America's pint --The conversion of Calles --Dictator by courtesy of oil --The struggle for the Panama Canal --Soldiers of the battle of oil --The wells of Araby --The nemesis of Sinclair --Russia.

While an interesting pitch for a book, it lacks any of the punch of say a Noam Chomsky, John Pilger or George Monbiot essay on the Alas it turned out to be a pretty lacklustre history book of twentieth century conflict with a skew towards the relevance of oil in modern warfare/5(2).

The United States has a well-known history of fighting wars for oil. The fossil fuel industry relies on militarization to uphold its operations around the globe.

Oil is the leading cause of war: An estimated one-quarter to one-half of all interstate wars since have been linked to oil. The book starts with a look at Empire building and how at the start of the 20th century Britain, France and Germany sought to carve up the world\'s supplies of \'black gold\'.

The clamour for oil intensified during World War II - in fact the bombing of Pearl Harbour was allegedly at least in part to prevent Indonesian oil from reaching the US. In War Water, I like to put things that fester and decompose because that is a sort of natural fuel for the curse.

In War Powder, some herbs are actually useful. In War Oil, the oil itself is the fuel, and since the intention is to punish, I feel no need to add more of anything that would grow or that could be beneficial to them.

This book is a page-turner. The author has crafted an original manner to completely and comprehensively refute US disinformation by turning American foreign policy against itself.” — Arnold August, a Canadian journalist and lecturer, is the author of Democracy in Cuba and the –98 Elections and, more recently, Cuba and Its Neighbours.

The use of conventional military force as in Iraq can bring neither stability nor security of supply. This book examines the relationship between oil and war in six different regions: Angola, Azerbaijan, Colombia, Indonesia, Nigeria and Russia.

Each country has substantial oil reserves, and has a long history of conflict. Collection consists of ration coupons, stickers, permits, and certificates for tires, bicycles, typewriters, sugar, shoes, fuel oil, gasoline, and food which were issued by the Office of Price Administration between There are duplicates for a few items.

Collection consists of ration coupons, stickers, permits, and certificates for tires, bicycles, typewriters, sugar, shoes, fuel oil. Books shelved as war: The Book Thief by Markus Zusak, All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque, Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut Jr., C.

The thing that bothers me about this "it was for the oil" is the brazen stupidity of such a strategy. We introduced instability into the middle East. This war is more about "not getting oil." If you are going to have a war for economic reasons, at least pick a war you can win.

posted by dances_with_sneetches at PM on September 2,   Just as wars over oil played a major role in 20th century history, a new book makes a convincing case that many 21st century conflicts will be fought over water.This book argues that the main reason why oil-rich countries are prone to war is because of the character of their society and economy.

Sectarian groups compete for access to oil resources and finance their military adventures through smuggling oil, kidnapping oil executives, or blowing up pipelines. Outside intervention only makes things worse.